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LEFT THE MSD:

Fulfilling my campaign promise, the city council and I took immediate steps to exit the MSD. We thereby asserted control over our funds, and then entered contracts with Salt Lake County for services. We accomplished this at minimal expense and without any disruption in vital municipal services.

As a result, Millcreek has been able to negotiate a customized level of service and to negotiate cost savings for courts, prosecution and legal defense services among others. Where cost savings could be achieved, other services have been taken in-house.

LEFT THE POLICE TAXING DISTRICT:

I negotiated Millcreek’s exit from the Salt Lake Valley Law Enforcement Service Area. In so doing, we received a transfer of Millcreek’s share of fund balance (over $1 million).

I then discovered an accounting error in the UPD budget whereby Millcreek had been overcharged $1.1 million for shared services. I was able to correct that error, and as a result, we obtained six additional UPD officers to serve our Millcreek precinct. One of these officers serves Millcreek on the DEA Drug Enforcement Task Force. The other five comprise the Millcreek Community Crimes Suppression Unit, a team that concentrates on solving street crimes, free of the duties of regular patrol. This unit has been responsible for numerous arrests of vehicle and residential burglars, busting drug dealers operating drug houses and targeted speed enforcement to address concerns of Millcreek residents.

ORDINANCES UPDATED:

I campaigned for updating Millcreek’s 60 year-old zoning ordinances. We have rewritten a number of our ordinances, getting rid of outdated uses like rendering plants, and drayage. Ordinances are being continually reviewed and updated now to allow for better processes. Since the city was incorporated, the Council adopted new regulations for the multifamily residential, manufacturing, and commercial zones. The Council also approved new standards for parking, residential accessory buildings and short-term rentals. In response to community concerns, the Council passed new rules requiring a height transition wherever a multifamily building is proposed next to a residential zone. City staff is currently hard at work at an update the City’s sign code and updating and improving how we provide public notice for land use decisions.

GENERAL PLAN COMPLETE:

In my campaign, I promised better planning for Millcreek. We launched a general plan initiative, and conducted more public outreach than ever before to get your input. The guiding document for future development of Millcreek was adopted earlier this year, after two years of public meetings and citizen input (including 912 online survey responses, and more than 2,000 in-person participants at 22 separate outreach opportunities).

MILLCREEK CENTER ON ITS WAY:

Plans for a city center for Utah’s 10th largest city are coming together, thanks to master planning help from the Wasatch Front Regional Council, state tax increment financing tools being set up through a Community Reinvestment Agency, and a Phase One approved for 560 residential units and 28,000 square feet of new retail. The draft plan envisions a significant open space to be built as part of the development

MILLCREEK RECOGNIZED AS A FINALIST FOR THE UTAH ETHICAL LEADERSHIP AWARD FOR GOVERNMENT:

Millcreek was recognized as a leader in transparency and responsive government. The accolade was given by the University of Utah Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative and the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah. The distinction is granted to governmental entities within the state of Utah in recognition for their integrity, trust, accountability, transparency, fairness, respect, rule of law and viability. 

MILLCREEK PROMISE:

Millcreek Promise launched “Read with Kids” at Mill Creek Elementary, to connect volunteers with students to promote reading on grade level. In addition, we worked to obtain $500,000 in grants to initiate an after school program at Mill Creek Elementary. This work, in collaboration with United Way and other partners are moving the Promise Program closer to realizing the first of the three promises the city has made: Education. The Education Promise is to strengthen and support efforts that maximize academic success, envisioning all Millcreek youth as college graduates. Work continues on the remaining two promises of Health & Safety and Economic Well-being.

RECOUPED MISDIRECTED STATE TAX FUNDS GENERATED FROM 200 MILLCREEK BUSINESSES:

Redirected state taxes from approximately 200 businesses in Millcreek that had been incorrectly distributed by Utah State Tax Commission to other surrounding cities.

MILLCREEK YOUTH COUNCIL ORGANIZED:

The Youth Council was organized to give young people in Millcreek a voice in city affairs and help them prepare for future life experiences, as well as the opportunity to serve the community in meaningful ways in a fun and educational environment.

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT:

We brought on board an Emergency Manager, who successfully obtained an EMPG Grant to facilitate building emergency management programs. We also coordinated a successful Community Wildfire Preparedness Day, directed completion of new format CERT class for Millcreek residents. and reorganized and strengthened the Millcreek Emergency & Resiliency Council.

FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY:

Millcreek ended fiscal year 2018 with a fund balance of $4,345,632, paid cash for all purchased fleet vehicles and start-up costs and underwent an outside audit which resulted in no negative findings.

For fiscal year 2019, the city has maintained a fund balance of 16.04%, — consistently many points higher than the statutory 5% minimum.

The City obtained a AA+ bond rating in the summer of 2019 from outside financial experts, who very favorably viewed our prudent fiscal management and our strong tax base. This is the highest rating that a newly incorporated city of our size could obtain.