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Proven, Responsive Leadership

Since the last mayoral election, Millcreek has

GAINED MORE THAN 1,000 NEW JOBS

There were 13,898 employed by Millcreek businesses at incorporation, which is up to 14,902 today

MORE THAN $22 MILLION IN GRANTS FOR INFRASTRUCTURE

The City sought and and was awarded more than $22 million in grant funding to start improving infrastructure

33% MORE BUSINESSES

Millcreek had 2,434 licensed businesses at incorporation, which we’ve grown to 3,170 today. New businesses like DownEast, Core Life Eatery, and Angel’s Automotive are coming to Millcreek

Jeff Silvestrini, Candidate for Millcreek Mayor, Gets Things DONE

Hello everyone. Jeff Silvestrini is running for re-election for the office of Mayor of Millcreek. As Millcreek’s first (and only) Mayor, Jeff has gotten the City off to a solid start. Here are some of the things he has accomplished:

GOT OUR NEW CITY UP AND RUNNING:

As Mayor, prior to hiring any staff, I made sure that all of the appropriate paperwork and notices were filed so that Millcreek’s tax revenue began timely flowing into the City’s treasury, while still maintaining consistent, quality services to our residents. We then started evaluating contracts with the county and hiring staff. Staffing levels in Millcreek now allow the City to take care of Millcreek’s municipal service needs. Residents are invited to come to the City Offices at 3330 S 1300 E or go online to apply for building permits, business licenses, special event permits, have questions regarding planning/zoning answered, report code compliance issues and much more. Using sound fiscal management, we are doing all of this at the same level of funding as before incorporation and we are providing better service. With the same budget, by eliminating excess overhead charged by the county, we have been able to hire more planners, more code enforcement officers, more building inspectors and plans examiners that worked for us in the county. We have also spread out our start-up costs (so that we were able to pay cash for the improvements to our city hall space over two fiscal years to even out the cost). We paid cash for all of our vehicles. We did this within our means and without sacrificing projects or levels of service by cutting out unnecessary overhead costs we were previously paying. Here are some of the highlights from the past two years, watch for many more exciting things to come.

LEFT THE MSD:

Fulfilling my campaign promise, the city council and I took immediate steps to exit the MSD and assert control over our funds and entered contracts with Salt Lake County for services. We accomplished this at minimal expense and without any disruption in vital municipal services. As a result, Millcreek has been able to negotiate a customized level of service and to negotiate cost savings for courts, prosecution and legal defense services among others. Other services have been taken in-house where cost savings could be achieved.

LEFT THE POLICE TAXING DISTRICT:

I negotiated Millcreek’s exit from the Salt Lake Valley Law Enforcement Service Area. In so doing, we received a transfer of Millcreek’s share of fund balance (over $1 million). I then discovered an accounting error whereby Millcreek had been overcharged $1.1 million for shared services. As a result, I was able to correct that error and obtain six additional UPD officers to serve our Millcreek precinct. One of these officers serves Millcreek on the DEA Drug Enforcement Task Force and the other five comprise the Millcreek Community Crimes Suppression Unit, a team which concentrates on solving street crimes, free of the duties of regular patrol. This unit has been responsible for numerous arrests of vehicle and residential burglars, busting drug dealers operating drug houses and targeted speed enforcement to address concerns of Millcreek residents.

REPRESENTING MILLCREEK ON NUMEROUS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS:

In addition to my duties as Mayor, to further Millcreek’s interests, I have become involved in numerous boards and commissions which affect Millcreek, our services, our funding opportunities and regional planning. I have sought and obtained leadership roles in many of these organizations, to give Millcreek a seat at the table and to better represent your interests. These include:

• Unified Police Department (board chair 2018; vice chair 2017);
• Unified Fire Authority Board; Unified Fire Service Area (taxing district)(Board Chair 2018-19);
• Salt Lake County Council of Governments (Chair 2019; vice chair 2018);
• Wasatch Front Regional Council (Vice Chair 2019-20; future chair 2021-22);
• Utah League of Cities and Towns (Board Member 2019);
• Central Wasatch Commission (Commissioner)
• Utah Federal Funds Commission (2018-2022)

GENERAL PLAN NEARING COMPLETION:

In my campaign, I promised better planning for Millcreek. We launched a general plan initiative, and conducted more public outreach than ever before to get your input. The guiding document for future development of Millcreek will be adopted early in 2019 after two years of public meetings and citizen input; outreach included 912 online survey responses, and over 2,000 in-person participants at 22 separate outreach opportunities

MILLCREEK CENTER ON ITS WAY:

Plans for a city center for Utah’s 10th largest city are coming together, thanks to master planning help from Wasatch Front Regional Council, state tax increment financing tools being set up through a Community Reinvestment Agency, and a Phase One approved for 560 residential units and 28,000 square feet of new retail. The draft plan envisions a significant open space to be built as part of the development

MILLCREEK RECOGNIZED AS A FINALIST FOR THE UTAH ETHICAL LEADERSHIP AWARD FOR GOVERNMENT:

Awarded by the University of Utah Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative and the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah recognizing integrity, trust, accountability, transparency, fairness, respect, rule of law and viability in government in the state of Utah; Millcreek was specifically recognized as a leader in transparency and responsive government.

MILLCREEK PROMISE:

Millcreek Promise launched “Read with Kids” at Mill Creek Elementary, to connect volunteers with students to promote reading on grade level. In addition, we worked to obtain $500,000 in grants to initiate an after school program at Mill Creek Elementary. This work, in collaboration with United Way and other partners are moving the Promise Program closer to realizing the first of the three promises the city has made: Education. The Education Promise is to strengthen and support efforts that maximize academic success, envisioning all Millcreek youth as college graduates. Work continues on the remaining two promises of Health & Safety and Economic Well-being.

MAJOR CHANGES COMING TO 3900 SOUTH IN 2020:

Obtained grant funding in the amount of $8.6M for reconstruction of 3900 S from I-215 to 2300 E as a complete street including sidewalks, bike lanes, curb & gutter, storm drains and reconstruction of the roadway in partnership with Holladay City

SALES TAX REVENUES UP 8%:

Among all businesses in Millcreek, sales averaged 8% higher this year than last year

MORE BUSINESSES:

Millcreek had 2,434 licensed businesses at incorporation, which we’ve grown to 3,170 today. New businesses like DownEast, Core Life Eatery, and Angel’s Automotive are coming to Millcreek

MORE THAN 1,000 NEW JOBS:

There were 13,898 employed by Millcreek businesses at incorporation, which is up to 14,902 today

TWO OF UTAH’S OPPORTUNITY ZONES ARE IN MILLCREEK:

The U.S. Department of the Treasury is providing tremendous tax incentives for investment in key census tracts, and two of Utah’s 42 are here

RECOUPED OVER $57,000 IN STATE TAX FUNDS:

Redirected state taxes from approximately 200 businesses in Millcreek that had been incorrectly distributed by Utah State Tax Commission

IMPROVING MILLCREEK WATER QUALITY:

Participated in a public education and outreach program to educate residents and businesses about the importance of keeping water clean; inspected and monitored over 30 construction sites to ensure construction related pollutants are properly contained and disposed of on-site; coordinated with SLCO Health Dept to track and enforce any illegal dumping into the storm drain system or waterways

LEGISLATIVE INFLUENCE:

Millcreek Mayor Silvestrini spent time testifying alongside our Millcreek legislators to make important changes to laws that impact Millcreek residents, assisting in passing three major pieces of legislation including reducing the time that fireworks may be discharged and increasing the fines for illegal discharges; increasing the penalties for willfully harming a K9 police officer and addressing ID theft by implementing penalties for possession of certain equipment

MILLCREEK BUSINESS COUNCIL ORGANIZED:

Officers are now in place, subcommittees are forming, and a survey of all licensed businesses has been conducted to identify where Millcreek’s business community can best help our new city

UPWARD WITH THE ARTS:

Awarded funding from the Cultural Facilities Implementation Program for the Millcreek Arts Discovery Program to conduct a city-wide comprehensive cultural discovery process to empower Millcreek elected officials to make informed decisions about how best to develop the city’s cultural and artistic resources.

MILLCREEK YOUTH COUNCIL ORGANIZED:

To give young people in Millcreek a voice in city affairs and help them prepare for future life experiences as well as the opportunity to serve the community in meaningful ways in a fun and educational environment

US CENSUS COMPLETE COUNTY COMMITTEE FORMED:

Millcreek brought together leaders in the community to determine best outreach methods to ensure the most complete count possible in the upcoming 2020 census

HUMAN RESOURCES FUNCTIONS BROUGHT IN-HOUSE:

All human resources and employee recruitment transitioned from an outside contractor at a lower cost

BUDGET PROCESSES:

Millcreek ended fiscal year 2018 with a fund balance of $4,345,632, paid cash for all purchased fleet vehicles and start-up costs and underwent an outside audit which resulted in no negative findings

ORDINANCES UPDATED:

I campaigned for updating Millcreek’s 60 year-old zoning ordinances. We have rewritten a number of our ordinances, getting rid of outdated uses like rendering plants, and drayage. Ordinances are being continually reviewed and updated now to allow for better processes. Since the city was incorporated, the Council adopted new regulations for the multifamily residential, manufacturing, and commercial zones. The Council also approved new standards for parking, residential accessory buildings and short-term rentals. In response to community concerns, the Council passed new rules requiring a height transition wherever a multifamily building is proposed next to a residential zone. City staff is currently hard at work at an update the City’s sign code and updating and improving how we provide public notice for land use decisions

CATCHING UP WITH INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS:

Safer sidewalks added to Upland Drive; pavement overlays completed annually to extend the lifetime of Millcreek roadways; sidewalk trip hazard saw-cutting sections completed annually to keep pedestrians safe; grant funding obtained in the amount of $155,000 to complete safer sidewalk sections along 33rd S, 7th E, and 4705 S in 2019

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS:

I worked hard in the last two years to assure that we pursued opportunities for grant funding to improve our infrastructure. Among our accomplishments are these grants, which together total more than $22 million:

• Safe Routes to School (on state routes) – $278K
• 4705 S:1380 E and 1450 E – $70,325
• 700 E: Empire to Redmaple – $62,250)
• 3300 S: 2300 E to Pioneer St – $88,000
• 3300 S: 1885 E to 1940 E – $57,000
• TIGER GRANT – $395K (in partnership with UTA – using $79K of Salt Lake County CATNIP grant funds for city matching contribution)
• CATNIP GRANT – $169K (Main Street improvements, including Sidewalk, Storm Drain, Active Transportation)
• TIGER Grant local municipality match – (See TIGER Grant above) – $78,942
• Bike facilities (Jupiter Dr, Siggard Dr, Upland Dr, Oakview) – $90,000
• UDOT TIF GRANT – I-215; 3900 SOUTH INTERCHANGE – $1.0M
• WFRC GRANTS – $4.43M
• 3900 S: I-215 to 2300 E with Holladay City – $4.0M
• 3300 S Sidewalk: 2600 E to 2700 E – $430K
• SLCO TRANSPORTATION CHOICE FUND – $5.7M
• 3900 S: I-215 to 2300 E with Holladay City – $4.7M (to add to 2017 $4.0M – see WFRC Grants above)
• Multi-modal Transportation Study with SLC – 1.0M

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT:

Brought on board an Emergency Manager who successfully obtained an EMPG Grant to facilitate building emergency management programs; coordinated a successful Community Wildfire Preparedness Day, directed completion of new format CERT class for Millcreek residents, reorganized and strengthened the Millcreek Emergency & Resiliency Council.

STORM DRAIN & TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN:

Created plans to guide storm drain and transportation improvements complementing the new Millcreek General Plan.

PARKS:

Millcreek obtained $350,000 in grant funding to improve Sunnyvale Park, including new lighting, futsal courts, and improvements and additions to the playground and pavilion. Completed improvements in Canyon Rim and Scott Avenue Parks. Led successful fundraising to purchase open space in Millcreek’s eastern foothills.